Free to Speak: A salon discussion on the state of free expression in Canada

Date: 
Thursday, May 2, 2013
Location: 
Norman Felix Gallery, 627 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON

Presented by CJFE in partnership with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO

On May 2, 2013, CJFE will launch the publication of its annual Review of Free Expression in Canada with a salon-style conversation focusing on this hard won and frequently challenged Charter right. The evening will honour World Press Freedom Day on May 3, and will bring together a diversity of opinions and voices to speak about free expression and why it matters to all Canadians.

Follow our live blog at live.cjfe.org or join the conversation on Twitter using #freetospeak!

Attendance:

By invitation only.

Event Details

Who:

Speakers
Lillian Allen, writer, dub poet and musician | @LillianAllenDub
Michael Healey, playwright and actor, The Drawer Boy and Proud | @healeytypes
Franke James, visual artist and climate science activist | @frankejames
Elizabeth Renzetti, columnist and feature writer for The Globe and Mail | @lizrenzetti
Hosted by
Anna Maria Tremonti, host of CBC’s The Current

What:

A cocktail party and salon featuring a diverse and interesting selection of presenters, who will each briefly discuss and explore what free expression means to them.

Where:

Norman Felix Gallery, 627 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON

When:

Thursday, May 2, 2013. 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. (Doors open at 6:30)

Why:

To help us celebrate the launch of our Review, our annual publication that provides an in depth examination of the free expression issues affecting Canadians.

About the Presenters

Anna Maria Tremonti, host of CBC’s The Current | Emcee
Anna Maria Tremonti has been the host of The Current on CBC Radio One since its creation in 2002. Prior to that, she spent almost two decades as a television correspondent, mostly for The National and the investigative program the fifth estate. Anna Maria was a foreign correspondent based in Berlin, London, Jerusalem and Washington in the 1990s. She covered politics on Parliament Hill for almost five years, and has been a radio and television reporter in Alberta and the Maritimes.


Lillian Allen, writer, dub poet and musician
Lillian Allen is a dub poet, musician, writer and Juno award winner who has published and performed her work across Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, and Europe. Previously a Writer in Residence at University of Windsor, she is currently a Faculty of Liberal Studies Professor at the Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD), where she teaches Creative Writing, and is a past executive member of the Sectoral Commission on Culture and Information of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.


Michael Healey, playwright and actor The Drawer Boy and Proud
Michael Healey is a playwright and actor who trained at the Ryerson Theatre School. Michael’s acting credits in television and film include This Is Wonderland and Late Fragment. His first full-length play, The Drawer Boy, has been produced across North America and internationally, and has been translated into German, French and Japanese. His most recent play, Proud, concluded Healey’s dramatic trilogy on Canadian social virtues.



Franke James, visual artist and climate science activist
Franke James is an award-winning, Toronto-based artist known for her illustrated essays on environmental and social issues. Two years ago, Franke protested the government's muzzling of environmental voices, by mounting a crowd-funded outdoor art show, in Ottawa. Franke is the author of "Bothered by My Green Conscience" and a member of the Writers Union of Canada, PEN Canada, and Canadian Artists Representation (CARFAC). Her new illustrated book “Banned on the Hill: a true story of Dirty Oil and Government Censorship” will be published in May, and available through Amazon.com

Elizabeth Renzetti, columnist and feature writer for The Globe and Mail
Elizabeth Renzetti is columnist and feature writer with The Globe and Mail. She has lived in Los Angeles and London, and recently returned to Toronto where she lives with her family and a cat named Perdu who keeps getting lost.


About The Canadian Commission for UNESCO

The Canadian Commission for UNESCO acts as a forum for governments and civil society to mobilize the participation of Canadian organizations and committed individuals in UNESCO's mandated areas: education, natural and social sciences, culture and communication and information. UNESCO promotes freedom of expression and freedom of the press as a basic human right, through lobbying and monitoring activities.
Visit UNESCO.ca for more information.